Genrefying – Part 2 – Labels

So, in part one I talked about how I was writing the genre in every book cover.  This took forever!  Well, it felt like it.  It took more like 4 more days.

I noticed something during that time – there was no way that Sci Fi and Fantasy could stay together.  There are way too many in that category to stay together.  And, it was something I considered anyhow, since I could justify having them together, but kind of not.  So, like any sane librarian, I Googled to see what others did.  I found some who kept them together; others did not.  And I could see why – one belongs with magic and spells, witchcraft, etc.  The other belongs with dystopian, with futuristic, with robots.  So, I decided to separate them.  But this led to another problem – labels.

As I showed last post, I had my categories set.  I had actually already purchased my labels (this was an exciting adventure, but one for another post) so I was stuck.  Or so I thought.  I then realized my romance section wasn’t as large as some of the others, and so by not labeling the graphic novels, I had what I needed.  🙂  So, of course I had to switch around colors.  Now, romance/relationships are purple, Sci-Fi is blue, Action/Adventure is red.  It works.

So, back to genrefying books.  As I said it took me close to 4 days just to get every book labeled with its genre.  It definitely took time!  I recommend anyone who does this to be patient and have perseverance.  There were times I wanted to just stop.  But, I got through it.

By that point, my colored labels came in.  It was an exciting day when they came in.  And it was perfect, because at that point I was working on a collaborative project with one of the ELA teachers in my building.  She does speed book dating, which I’ll get to in another post.  So, getting books labeled with extremely important to do, and do quickly.  But, there was a slight hitch – the former librarian chose to relabel book series with the start of the series title instead of the authors name.  So, I have to go back and relabel the spine labels and then put the genre labels on.  So, more time.  With 4 days in, I”m about 75% done with the fiction labeling.  I mostly just have to print and relabel spine labels and then put the genre labels on.  But, it’s going!

Oh, my favorite thing.  My students have been watching me do this for now 2 weeks if they come in the library, which most do when they need something from the printer.  The look at me and one day, one asked, “Ms Becker, are you going to have to do this to all the books?!?” Yes, yes I am.  But the end result will be worth it.

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My BreakoutEDU boxes

breakout

Image from BreakoutEDU.com

So I have done BreakoutEDU boxes a couple times.  At edcamps, as well as during a half-day PD where a colleague brought in her set.  I love them.  If you have no idea about BreakoutEDU boxes, check out this video to get you started.

Anyhow, I love the boxes as I said, but I could not figure out how to justify paying $125 per box.  Sorry BreakoutEDU people, that’s a toughy for me.  Apparently they used to have an open source list to build your own, but it has since gone away (see link at the end).  So, in true Jennifer Lagarde style (who unbeknownst to me literally just wrote a blog post about this exact thing!) and  #MacGyverLibrarianship, I searched online, sourced different blogs, and made my own.


My BreakoutEDU Box.png

So, I should mention some things.  First, I love Menards.  Obviously.  Second, I bought several things on sale or for different prices that what I have found as of today.  That will definitely change prices if you choose to go a similar way to me.  Third, my goal was to create 5 boxes.  I have almost 4 sets (reason is because of that one darn 4 digit lock that has failed.)  I have a few things I need to add to make the 5th set, which may or may not cost a bit more overall.  But, I think I did well in doing a little bit of #MacGyverLibrarianship! I’m really looking forward to using these with my students, as soon as I get them to school.

What have your experiences with these boxes been like?  How about when students open them?  Did you add a treat or something other than just the sign?  I’d love to hear what you did!

Other blogs sourced (link goes directly to the post):

Mirror Into Teaching

Hey Mr. Stern

 

Google Drawing

So I came upon a lesson from teacherspayteachers.com for Google drawing.  I really liked this lesson because it incorporated the winter theme without specifically stating that students must create something Christmas-y (I avoid that as much as I can).  I came across Computer Elementary Activities , which I really liked as they had a nice snowman, and directions on how to have students draw it.  For my students, because I know their listening levels (basically 0), I instead put the important directions on the board and allowed students a bit of creativity with it.  I was actually surprised by how many of my students enjoyed it!  I did this with 6th grade to start.  Several of my students, who are normally not the best in my class, did exceptionally well!  I asked that if they wouldn’t mind if I could have a link to them to keep them, as I was just that impressed.  Here are some examples.  I highly recommend this lesson, especially as it gets closer to winter break and kids get antsy!

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Symbaloo Screencast-O-Matic

I was cleaning off my desktop today and found this edtech gem.  I’m pretty proud of it: it is reminiscent of my Instructional Designer days, and I know I worked hard getting everything right in one take.  Not an easy thing!  What could I improve on?  What else should I add for the next one?  I think I’d like to do more of these for my school at some point, for both students and staff…

Plickers – My Obsession

plickersHello, my name is Jamie, and I’m addicted to Plickers.  I can’t help it.  They’re so easy to use, and great for a non-BYOD school!

I was first introduced to them in my library classes.  We used them for various quick assessments to find what we knew and so forth.

Since then, I’ve introduced them to my students.  Many of them like when I pass them out, because they get to “win” when they get an answer right.  Even though I never have them assigned to specific students, I tend to watch which numbers I give to certain students to see whether they are struggling to answer or not.  We all have those students we know either gets it or doesn’t, and gives us a pulse for the whole class.

I have used them for a variety of general assessments, such as seeing how well my students understand and can conceptualize the Dewey Decimal System, library terms, and now for media literacy.  To say I love using them is really an understatement.

Website Validity/Evaluation

So, this week I am teaching my 5th and 6th graders about website validity this week.  I am extremely thankful for the resources from http://www.schrockguide.net/ , especially the collection of fake websites.  It is really beneficial to not have to reinvent the wheel in a lot of cases.  What makes me really happy is that I found the website evaluation tool I made for one of my library classes.  I think I did a decent job, if I might say so myself, and really like how it looks overall.  I am hoping my students will find it useful as well as they evaluate different sites.

If someone is interested, I would qualify this under the CC BY-ND for creative commons.  You can use and share, but please don’t change, and please credit me.

File: Becker_Web_Evaluation

Library Wordle

 

In class today we were discussing Wordle.net.  So, I decided that I would create a wordle myself that included library words!  Fair warning, though if you use this; the site is a bit tempermental when it comes to Chrome.  I had to use Internet Explorer….

wordle

 

Here are the words I added in to create this (Note: the ~ keeps multiple words together!)

Library Library Library Teacher Teacher Teacher Information~Literacy Information~Specialist Instructional~Partner Program~Administrator Collaboration Web~2.0 Professional~Development Books Books Books Reference Reference Collection~Analysis Information~Access Information Information Technology Technology Advocate Manager Programs Workshops Professional~Development Integration Resources Instruction Catalog Assessment Book~Fair Book~Club Partner Displays Books Magazines References Computers Reading~Program Reading Partner Online Online~Database Online~Resources Welcoming~Environment Access Author~Visits Student~Suggestions Teacher~Suggestions Technology Instruction Students Students Student~needs Twitter Web~2.0 Photos Videos Webpages Coding Google Education K-12 Library Library~Media~Center Library~Media~Center Technology Collaboration Piktochart Powtoon Screencast Animoto Glogster Creative~Commons Creative~Commons MLA~Citation Fair~Use Intellectual~Property Catalog Reading Reading Reading Creating Creating Partner Vimeo Prezi Google~Docs Jing Skype Screenr Symbaloo Voki Wiki Research Reference Copyright Research Creating Banned~Book Media~Center E-Books Students Displays Bulletin~Boards Biographies Fiction Non-Fiction E-Mail Print Information~Power Information AASL Library~Program Professional School~Goals Authors Heart~of~the~School Leaders Digital~Age Advocate Community Learning Inquiry Inquiry Big~6 Information~Literacy Software Resource~Sharing Access Webpage Flickr QR~Codes Google~Earth PLN Bibliography Articles Journals EBSCO Discussions Annotations Research~Papers